How to Prepare and Eat Edamame

Edamame makes us very happy. It is currently a very expensive and labor intensive crop, since it's harvested by hand, but farmer Mary Ellen Raymond says she is working on a solution. A robotics student at the UMSL extension is designing an automated picker and we hope it will allow for cheaper edamame in our future. We also hope to get SLU to freeze some for our winter shares. For now, we'll enjoy them in moderation, but enjoy them we will.

To prepare your edamame, rinse in a colander, boil in salted water for 3 to 5 minutes, and drain and cool. Toss with more salt, if desired. Pop the beans out of the pod with your thumb and forefinger (or your teeth). Enjoy as is or use in a recipe, such as Edamame Pesto--just substitute edamame for carrot tops in this recipe and it makes a wonderful spread for crackers or cucumbers!

Tip: Dried Tomatoes

Pour a tablespoon of wine or balsamic vinegar over tomatoes, cover and let stand 30 minutes. Add herbs and bay leaf Cover tomatoes with oil; stir or tap jar to remove any trapped air. Store in fridge use within 6 weeks. Additions Add feta cheese, olives…serve with pasta, salads or serve as an appetizer with a...Read more

Testimonials

We are very happy to have our products included in shares through Fair Shares.  The folks at Fair Shares have set-up a great distribution schedule that works with smaller scale local farmers taking into account weekly and seasonal limitations in harvesting. The staff at Fair Shares are easy to work with, being both friendly and professional.  They have been very straightforward about their needs and those that the share members represent. We look forward to growing with Fair Shares!

Bobbi Sandwisch, Live Springs Farm, Carrollton, IL 100% Grassfed Beef, Pasture-Raised Pork, Chicken, and Eggs